'Extremely rare blood' donations needed to save 2-year-old Florida girl

Faith Castro
December 6, 2018

OneBlood is working with other groups, as well as the American Rare Donor Program, an organization that searches worldwide for rare blood donors, to find matches for Zainab, as she will need blood transfusions for the foreseeable future.

OneBlood says people who are of Indian, Pakistani or Iranian descent are statistically the only people to be a possible donor match for Zainab, and of those groups, less than 4 percent are missing the Indian B antigen. Zainab's donor must also have an "O" or "A" blood type.

The tumor inside Zainab Mughal's belly may have been growing for 10 months without anyone knowing.

While the blood won't cure Zainab's cancer, it will allow her to undergo two bone marrow transplants, which will make her stronger and allow doctors to give her higher doses of chemotherapy, Forbes said. So far, three matching donors have been located, including a donor that ARDP located in the United Kingdom, near London. 'This was the worst thing we were expecting'.

Raheel Mughal, Zainab's father said, "My daughter, she is still a long way away from being ideal".

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To help the child in her fight against cancer, the non-profit blood donation organization OneBlood launched a campaign dedicated to finding people with the right blood type who can donate blood for Zainab.

The two-year-old from South Florida, Zainab suffers from Neuroblastoma, a cancer that grows from immature nerve cells surrounding the adrenal glands that affects children of five years of age or under. Around 800 new cases are diagnosed in the United States every year. In about 2 out of 3 cases, the cancer has already spread to the lymph nodes or other parts of the body upon diagnosis. The 2-year-old neuroblastoma patient has a rare blood type because of a genetic mutation.

OneBlood is coordinating compatibility testing and asks that prospective donors specify that they are looking to donate for Zainab, so the blood can be tagged for testing. None of Zainab's family have turned out to be matches, Mughal said. As of OneBlood's December 3 release, more than 1,000 donors have been tested and three have been identified.

'We need to find more.It's a humble request, and I request it from my heart, ' said Raheel Mughal said in the video.

"What you're doing to save a human life, my daughter's life, is unbelievable", shared Mughal.

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