40 million with diabetes could be without insulin by 2030

Faith Castro
November 23, 2018

The rate at which people are developing diabetes has experts anxious that we will not be able to keep up with the demand for insulin.

Though few lifestyle changes, changing the diet and some natural foods aid to lower blood sugar level, the need for insulin have not come down but rather the need increasing more than the production. Insulin treatment is expensive and the market is now dominated by three manufacturers, according to the study.

They predicted that, worldwide, the number of adults with type 2 diabetes will rise from 406 million in 2018 to 511 million in 2030.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", said lead author Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, US.

The researchers calculated that compared to current levels of insulin access, if universal global access was achieved, the number of people with type 2 diabetes worldwide using insulin in 2030 would double (from around 38 million to 79 million). Study Says The Ketogenic Diet Could Increase The Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.

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A study published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, says access to insulin will fall well short of demand. At present more than 400 million people are affected by diabetes globally and there is an environment prevailing that it would increase in the upcoming years.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat noncommunicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", Basu said.

It should be also noted that about 33 million people now do not have access to insulin.

On this basis, insulin use is estimated to increase from 51.6 crore per year in 2018 to63.37 crore per year in 2030. "Except if governments start activities to make insulin accessible and affordable, at that point its utilization is continually going to be a long way from optimal".

Insulin, however, remains costly and prices can be especially out of reach in poorer countries, where tortuous supply chains and high markups by middlemen often make it unaffordable for many patients.

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