Snowstorm kills nine climbers on Nepal peak

Frederick Owens
October 14, 2018

A group of five South Korean climbers and four Nepali climbers and porters has been reported missing after a storm hit a camp on a Himalayan peak in west Nepal, officials said on Saturday.

The permit listed four South Korean climbers, but a fifth member had joined the team later, according to Suresh Dakal of Trekking Camp Nepal, the expedition organiser.

Their bodies were spotted yesterday by the pilot of a rescue helicopter, who described the camp as being in tatters. The climbers were attempting to scale the 7,193-meter (23,590-foot) peak during the Autumn climbing season. The other South Korean climbers who died have been identified as Lee Jaehun, Rim Il-jin, Yoo Youngjik, and Jeong Joon-mo.

The base camp was found destroyed Friday, but the authorities said the exact timing of the incident can not be confirmed at the moment.

He said: 'Everything is gone, all the tents are blown apart'. The deceased include five South Koreans.

A rescue team Sunday began retrieving the bodies of nine climbers killed in a violent storm on Nepal's Mount Gurja, a freak accident that has left the mountaineering community reeling.

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The previous year, 16 Sherpas were killed on Everest when an avalanche swept through the Khumbu Icefall.

A sixth South Korean climber was staying at a village lower in the valley when the storm hit, after being forced to a lower altitude by health problems.

Rarely-climbed Gurja lies in Nepal's Annapurna region, next to avalanche-prone Dhaulagiri - the world's seventh highest mountain.

Kim became the first person in the country and the fastest in the world to summit the world's 14 highest mountains without using supplementary oxygen in 2013.

The BBC reported that according to the Himalayan Database no one has stood on Gurja's summit since 1996.

Four climbers have perished on Gurja´s flanks and a total of 30 have successfully reached its peak - a fraction of the more than 8,000 people who have summited Everest, the world´s highest mountain.

Other reports by LeisureTravelAid

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