Protesters storm Capitol steps ahead of Kavanaugh vote: 'Shame! Shame!'

Frederick Owens
October 9, 2018

While the vote was not necessarily indicative of the final confirmation vote, it moved him one step closer to sitting on the highest court in the land, with three out of four key undecided senators voting "yes" to advance the nomination.

Kavanaugh's nomination sparked protest across the Capitol, which continued Saturday. Flake announced Friday morning that he would support Kavanaugh's confirmation, reiterating his statement of support the previous week.

A procedural vote Friday made Saturday's confirmation a foregone conclusion.

Melania (meh-LAH'-nee-ah) Trump is offering some supportive words for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

In a sense it would reflect a high water mark of the Trump presidency: Republican control of the White House, the Senate, the House of Representatives and the judiciary's top court.

Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., responded to one protester's call for Kavanaugh to take a polygraph test, asking: "Maybe we can dunk him in water and see if he floats?" "Great decision. I very much appreciate those 50 great votes and I think he's going to go down as a totally brilliant Supreme Court Justice for many years".

Collins, as well as Sens.

"Either Sen. Collins VOTES NO on Kavanaugh OR we fund her future opponent", the campaign, hosted by Crowdpac, is titled.

Republicans control the Senate by a 51-49 margin, and Saturday's roll call vote seems destined to be almost party-line, with just a single defector from each side.

Collins, perhaps the chamber's most moderate Republican, proclaimed her support for Kavanaugh at the end of a floor speech that lasted almost 45 minutes. "We will get you out of office". White House Counsel Don McGahn, who helped salvage Kavanaugh's nomination as it teetered, sat in the front row of the visitors' gallery for the vote with deputy White House press secretary Raj Shah. Still, failing to confirm Kavanaugh would have been a disaster for the Republicans and the party's victory may also energize conservatives.

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"We know that in our role of advice and consent it is not just the record itself, there is more that is attached to it", Murkowski said.

A recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll showed in fact that the Republicans have narrowed the enthusiasm gap with Democrats in the past few weeks. They said he also seemed ready to rule for Trump if federal authorities probing his 2016 campaign's alleged connections to Russian Federation try to pursue him in court.

Collins and Murkowski are the only GOP senators who support abortion rights, a crucial issue in the Kavanaugh debate. Steve Daines of Montana, who supports Kavanaugh but was in Montana to walk his daughter down the aisle at her wedding.

Even so, Collins said she hopes the ugly fight over Kavanaugh's confirmation will raise awareness of the pervasiveness of sexual assault. That would let Kavanaugh win by the same two-vote margin he'd have received had both senators voted.

Asked by reporters aboard Air Force One what message he had for women across the country who feel the nomination sends a message that their allegations of sexual assault aren't believed, Trump disagreed with the premise, saying women "were outraged at what happened to Brett Kavanaugh" and "were in many ways stronger than the men in his favor".

That vote occurred amid smoldering resentment by partisans on both sides, on and off the Senate floor.

Kavanaugh faces multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

Kavanaugh also faced questions about his temperament and his honesty during his politically charged hearings.

"There are a minimum of 7 additional people, known to the White House, the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Federal Bureau of Investigation who knew about the assault prior to the nomination who were not interviewed", Koegler wrote.

Ford, the 51-year-old research psychologist and professor who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teenagers in the 1980s, believes she "did the right thing" in coming foward, according to her attorneys.

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