Machines to handle half of work tasks by 2025

Isaac Cain
September 20, 2018

Simultaneously, rapid changes in machines and algorithms, or computer processes that are designed to solve problems, "could create 133 million new roles in place of 75 million that will be displaced between now and 2022", the group forecast.

In less than seven years, by 2025, machines are projected to overtake humans in workplace task hours in 12 key industry sectors, according to a "Future of Jobs" report by the World Economic Forum (WEF).

New skill sets for employees will be needed as labour between machines and humans continue to evolve, the report pointed out.

Machines will do more tasks than humans by 2025: World Economic Forum

Data provided to the think tank by executives from more than than 300 global companies suggest that machines will carry out an average of 42% of tasks by 2022, compared with 29% today.

"Businesses are set to expand their use of contractors doing task-specialised work, engage workers in more flexible arrangements, utilise remote staffing, and modify the locations where their organisation operates to ensure access to talent", the research, titled "The Future of Jobs 2018" said. Its authors say the outlook for job creation has become more positive since the last report in 2016 because businesses have a better sense of the opportunities made possible by technology. "This migration does not represent a great rupture in the jobs market, but a continuation of what has always happened with new technologies that automate tasks, going back to the first industrial revolution; the lowest skills are replaced by higher skills". Whilst the future of work will see more organisations adopt technologies such as these, their fundamental role will be to remove repetitive tasks and admin work, making way for employees to focus on more meaningful and creative work. "At the same time a greater number of new jobs will be created", said Saadia Zahidi, a WEF board member.

"People, whether they're workers or consumers, will only accept and tolerate the consequences if technology serves them - and not they it", Reiner Hoffmann told daily Welt in reaction to the WEF report.

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