Spain, Portugal swelter as heat wave kills 3 people

Gladys Abbott
August 5, 2018

The highest temperature ever recorded in Europe was 48°C in Athens in 1977, closely followed by 47.3°C in Amareleja, Portugal in 2003 as well as in Montoro, Spain past year.

Eight places across Portugal have seen the mercury reach near record highs, peaking at around 47 degrees in one region.

Elsewhere, temperatures in south-west France could reach the high 80s as the hot air mass moves north from Africa, bringing dust from the Sahara Desert to the continent.

114 people were killed in two massive forest blazes a year ago in Portugal and civil services yesterday sent mobile text alerts warning the population of an extreme risk of fires in some regions, including around the capital Lisbon.

'Combined with high pressure in charge, blue skies every day, and the ground already warmed up, that leads to a day-on-day build, combining to give us these intense temperatures'.

Beaches along the south coast of England - where 31C (87.8F) is forecast - are likely to be packed this weekend.

The torrid weather has been felt across Europe, as far north as Sweden and Britain, whose weather service said July was the country's third-warmest month in more than a century.

In the Middle East: Quriyat, Oman, likely set the world's hottest low temperature ever recorded on June 28, when the temperature failed to drop below 109°F, or 42.8°C.

Although holidaymakers might normally expect heat in the mid-30 degrees Celsius in these countries, there is the potential for extreme temperatures - edging towards 50 degrees Celsius.

Euro scorcher: European heatwave could reach all time highs with temperatures expected to reach a sizzling 48C this weekend

With this heat comes uncomfortable, muggy nights for southern Britain, but a tweet from the U.K.'s national weather service on Thursday night reminded Brits that temperatures are much higher in parts of Spain and Portugal.

Homes in Finland are created to handle the extreme cold and damp typical of the Nordic region, not the recent high temperatures.

The "furnace" blast is causing at least 27 of Spain's provinces to be labelled an "extreme risk", with the worst of the heat expected to the Iberian Peninsula, close to the boarder of Portugal.

With Europe facing a wide-ranging heatwave, some areas of Spain and Portugal are bracing for potentially record-breaking temperatures.

Boiling heat will blow across Europe this week as the UK's hottest summer continues.

Two men died of heat-stroke in the southeastern region of Murcia, Cadena Ser radio station reported on Wednesday.

In eastern Europe, Poland endured unusually high temperatures up to 34 degrees Celsius (93.2 Fahrenheit), forcing its power plants to go into emergency mode to increase output due to the wide use of air conditioning and electric fans.

A spokesman said: "We'll fry again".

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