Fortnite for Android Will Bypass Google’s Play Store

Isaac Cain
August 4, 2018

The firm is yet to announce a release date for Fortnite on Android, but it should be just around the corner.

Epic Games also suggests that it would enabled the company to have a more direct relationship with their customers, and he intends to take advantage of that on the platforms where this is possible.

But more importantly, Epic Games doesn't want to pony up for Google's 30 percent cut that it takes as a tax on purchases, because the game makes all its funding entirely through said purchases.

Fortnite Battle Royale has become a gaming sensation, a smash hit on every major gaming platform and earning an estimated $1 billion despite its free-to-play model. Google is hearing similar rhetoric in Europe, where it's been fined $5 billion for forcing its own software onto all Android phones instead of giving users a choice of which search and browser software to download for themselves. Considering the huge cost of running millions of constant online games that is a model that shouldn't make sense but Epic has been quite brilliant in how it makes money from the game: it allows players to buy in-game currency that then allows you to customize how your characters look in the game, and it charges "battle passes" - now $10 - that open up a wide variety of fun challenges within the game with rewards for their completion.

In short, Fortnite is simply the Big Game of the moment. This means that Note 9 owners will get access to Fortnite first, then there will be a period where owners of other Samsung devices will get to play it.

In a Q&A with Eurogamer, Epic's Tim Sweeney dished on the company's reasoning for doing so. That's not the case on Android, though, which lets you install apps from unknown sources fairly easily.

More news: NASA announces crew who will fly first commercial rockets into space

Epic does the same thing on the PC, where it uses its own installation program instead of the more ubiquitous Steam downloader, for essentially the same reason.

To us, this makes ideal sense, but it does open up players to a world of fake APKs that could potentially harm devices. Now, we asked in full recognition that Android has been left behind by Fortnite. Sweeney doesn't seem to anxious about this, saying that "Gamers have proven able to adopt safe software practices, and gaming has thrived on the open PC platform through many sources".

Fortnite is already available to download on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch via each platform's official store.

But so far, Android users have been unable to get in on the action.

Epic doesn't seem to be too keen on passing on 30% of its revenue to Google.

Other reports by LeisureTravelAid

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER