Judge Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court's Second Amendment

Gwen Vasquez
July 12, 2018

Yet, most Republicans are excited about the choice, energized by the prospect of making the Supreme Court more conservative.

Roughly 25.6 million people tuned-in to major broadcast and TV news networks Monday evening to watch Mr. Trump nominate Brett Kavanaugh to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy - about 21 percent fewer than the almost 33 million who watched live past year when the president picked Neil Gorsuch to replace late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, AdWeek first reported.

"I don't think that if he were to be confirmed, we would see large and sudden shifts in the way the court goes about its business", Covington said, adding that "It's relatively safe to assume that you would see some incremental movement to the right, simply because he will be more conservative, in some ways, that Justice Kennedy was".

Opposition figures wasted no time in assailing Kavanaugh, warning his confirmation would usher in the erosion of civil liberties and long-held rights, while conservatives were quick to drum up support for the nominee.

The White House has tried to portray President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, as a down-to-earth guy who engages in wholesome activities like watching sports and mentoring kids when he isn't ruling against women's reproductive rights or explaining why the president is above the law. But they are playing a very weak hand now, and there is little reason to believe that the next hand they are dealt will be any better.

There are five Democrat senators who are up for re-election in November.

Kavanaugh's nomination has already sparked controversy among Democrats - Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer promised Monday evening to fight the nomination "with everything I have" during the nomination process.

Calls to put party politics aside are likely to go unheard in Washington.

While Kavanaugh wrote that legal action against a president should be deferred, he also noted there is no current law that requires that.

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The second scenario is like the first, except with one or two Republicans opposing Kavanaugh, thereby putting Democratic senators in Republican states in the hot seat. John McCain of Arizona.

Great America PAC and Great America Alliance will next week launch a campaign to confirm Kavanaugh built around cable television, radio and digital ads in seven states that were won by Trump in 2016 and where Democratic senators are campaigning for reelection.

Kavanaugh met with key Republican senators on Capitol Hill on Wednesday as Democrats escalated efforts to block his confirmation.

Michael McDaniel, a constitutional law professor at Western Michigan University's Cooley Law School, said Kavanaugh is a judge with significant experience in cases involving federal agencies and has a deep understanding of both the judicial and executive branch.

Kavanaugh grew up in Washington as the son of a schoolteacher. Susan Collins of ME and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, to oppose any nominee who threatens the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision.

Kenneth Starr's investigative report concerning the death of former President Bill Clinton's aide, Vince Foster, and the 11 grounds for Clinton's impeachment, was co-authored by Kavanaugh.

Later he was part of Bush's legal team working on the 2000 Florida recount, which resulted in Bush's winning the presidency.

Still, this is the reality on Kavanaugh, according to Schoen: "Even if every Democrat votes against Kavanaugh, he will still be confirmed if no Republican votes against him".

In addition, the New York Democrat said, the nominee's writings reveal an expansive view of presidential authority that is ominous in the Trump era.

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