European Union backs Canadian leader Trudeau after Trump's sharp words

Frederick Owens
June 11, 2018

Heading into the leaders' summit in La Malbaie, Que., there were deep concerns the G7 alliance was fast becoming a G6 plus one because of a widening gulf between the USA and the rest of the group in key areas such as climate and trade.

The spat has also drawn in Germany and France, who sharply criticised Mr Trump's decision to abruptly withdraw his support for a G7 communique hammered out at a Canadian summit, accusing him of destroying trust and acting inconsistently.

A media statement by one of Trump's top White House advisers that there was a "special place in hell" for Trudeau also had a former us ambassador to Canada demanding an apology.

He added that Trudeau's statement risked making Trump look weak before his meeting with Kim Jong Un, the top leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) in Singapore.

Trump had earlier lashed out at Canadian leader Justin Trudeau for what he said were "false statements" at a news conference and said the U.S. would not endorse the G7 communique.

The White House is escalating its verbal attacks against Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of close American ally Canada.

Trump complained on Sunday that he had been blindsided by Trudeau's criticism of his tariff threats at a summit-ending news conference. -Canada ties but not talking about Canada's tariffs on dairy, which he says are "killing" American agriculture.

Similarly, Krueger said Trump was unlikely to take the countermeasures lying down and could hit back with more trade restrictions. "Well, the in-factual, the non-factual part of this was they have enormous tariffs", Kudlow said.

In a mocking tone, Kudlow rattled off the reasons Trudeau offered for his barbed critique of Trump's policies.

"There's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with President Donald J. Trump", Navarro insisted.

As Trump flew from the summit with USA allies to a planned meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore, he lashed out at Trudeau for what he said were his "false statements" at a news conference and said the US would not endorse the G7 communique, a negotiated statement on shared priorities among the group.

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Kudlow was particularly offended that Trudeau would say this ahead of Trump's North Korean summit. He had other things, bigger things on his plate in Singapore, he said.

Peter Navarro watches as President Donald Trump speaks before signing Section 232 proclamations on steel and aluminum imports in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on March 8, 2018 in Washington, D.C.

But unity was torn apart when the United States president took exception to Mr Trudeau calling U.S. policy "insulting".

"Are you disappointed the President is leaving early?" a reporter asked Trudeau. "That will not stand", he noted.

Canada's foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland, said her country "does not conduct its diplomacy through ad hominem attacks".

Trump had already said he would not hesitate to shut countries out of the U.S. market if they retaliate to steep tariffs he has imposed on steel and aluminium imports.

June 6 - Trudeau tells Global National that he's "disappointed" at the reasoning behind Trump's tariffs, saying he doesn't understand "in what universe" a long-time ally of the US could be considered a national security threat. "On the contrary, as part of the USA law, we are part of the national defense base of the United States".

"As Canadians, we are polite, we're reasonable, but also we will not be pushed around,"Trudeau said. We strive to reduce tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers and subsidies", it said, reflecting the typical language of decades of G7 statements".

Trudeau responded with tough words of his own at a press conference later Saturday, reiterating that Canada would move forward with a slew of tariffs in response to Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs. Those countermeasures are set to take effect on July 1.

"I know my colleagues are hearing from numerous businesses and manufacturers across the country very similar stories, that this trade dispute is probably two weeks away from affecting Canadians in a very real way", he said.

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