Netflix, Google, Others to Sue Over Net Neutrality Repeal

Gladys Abbott
January 9, 2018

Yesterday, the FCC published the order it voted on in December that rolls back the protections that help keep the Internet open and free.

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocrats turn on Al Franken Trump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Mo.) announced her support for the bill on Twitter, putting it over the top of a procedural requirement to bypass committee approval. In the meantime, net neutrality supporters are also pursuing litigation and state laws.

The move comes as a way of blocking FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and his gang of unconstitutional fuckboys from dismantling a free and open internet. The sponsors of the resolution include 29 Democrats and Sen. Given that Republicans have nearly unanimously supported the FCC's new rules, the prospects for the CRA are dim.

Getting a vote is only part of the battle. A tie vote would likely mean the deciding vote would be cast by VP Mike Pence, dooming the resolution.

While McCaskill's support is good news for those who wish to see the decision overturned, the vote in itself will not be enough to ensure that net neutrality will be restored.

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Still, Free Press and others are pushing forward, noting that the net neutrality rules are widely popular. A University of Maryland poll last month found that 83% of Americans and 75% of Republicans said they supported them. Once the bill goes to a vote, it will still need a majority to pass and then will wind up on Trump's desk, who is unlikely to approve the bill. It's starting to get real as the IA said they are looking to take legal action and provide as much legislative support as possible in the fight against the net neutrality repeal.

He continued: "Regardless of party affiliation, all elected officials should stand with their constituents and restore the 2015 protections that protect free speech, choice, and innovation online". This effectively ended what many called Net Neutrality.

Before this, a lot of the same big tech companies were fairly passive and inactive during the initial protests of the repeal. To do that, the bill will regulate business practices and use net neutrality as a condition in state contracts, cable franchise agreements and agreements that let companies place wireless broadband equipment on utility poles, his office said in a statement.

The Nebraska Telecommunications Association, which said it would study Morfeld's bill before taking a position on it, circulated a white paper among its 30 member companies a year ago describing the 2015 rules as trying "to fit a square peg in a round hole".

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