Leader of Yemen forces loyal to Saleh is dead, says GPC

Faith Castro
December 7, 2017

The Arab League's general secretariat condemned the Iran-aligned Houthi movement which killed Saleh as a "terrorist organisation" and demanded that the global community view it as such.

Everyone knows that it was Iranian intelligence that provided Houthi militias with Saleh's plan of action, and gave clear instructions to take him and his companions out in cold blood.

He said the fate of Abull Aziz Bin Habtoor, senior GPC member and prime minister of the Saleh-Houthi alliance's self-declared government, was unknown but that reports suggested the rebels had arrested him. The Anadolu Agency quoted sources, as saying, that the mortar shell triggered the fire at the embassy premises.

In a televised speech, Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi called on Yemenis to rise up against the Iran-aligned Houthis.

Around 20 women, dressed head to toe in black, did not hide their loyalty to the leader of three decades, who was killed by the Iran-backed rebels on Monday after their uneasy alliance collapsed.

There was no independent confirmation, but pictures circulated on social media appeared to show Mr Saleh's body.

Saleh on Saturday announced he was open to talks with Saudi Arabia and its allies on condition they ended their crippling blockade of Yemen's ports and airports.

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The Arabian peninsula's poorest country, Yemen is one of the most violent fronts in a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran, who have also backed opposing sides in Syria, Iraq and elsewhere across the Middle East. Witnesses said the bodies of slain civilians and fighters littered the streets as ambulances were unable to reach them.

Saleh's oldest son meanwhile pledged in a declaration sent to Reuters to fight the Houthis and liberate all territory held by the rebels.

At least 234 people have been killed and 400 wounded in five days of heavy fighting in the Yemeni capital, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

The Houthis and Saleh's forces began fighting each other in Sanaa last week.

The casualty tolls provided by the ICRC are separate from those sustained in airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition which is waging war on the rebels, known as Houthis.

The bloody conflict has left impoverished Yemen as the world's leading humanitarian disasters with millions of people facing starvation.

Jamie McGoldrick, of United Nations aid agency OCHA, said civilians in Sanaa are "emerging from their houses after five days being locked down, basically prisoners", to seek safety, medical care, fresh water and other survival needs.

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