Flu vaccine may be only 10 percent effective this year, experts say

Faith Castro
December 5, 2017

'Vaccines remain a valuable public health tool, and it is always better to get vaccinated than not to get vaccinated'. That is about the same number of students who received vaccines previous year and slightly less than 25 percent of the student body.

That H3N2 strain caused infections here past year, too.

The vaccine used in the Southern Hemisphere has the same composition of the one used in North America.

The predominant strain is H3N2 which mutates rapidly and often results in vaccines being less effective.

Everybody, starting at 6 months of age, according to the CDC.

According to the health department, 35 people have been hospitalized across Ohio.

But it can kill even the young and otherwise healthy.

An infectious disease specialist says this year's vaccine is not getting the job done.

And while the flu shot is not as effective in preventing H3N2, experts say everyone should still get one. A team of researchers from the World Health Organization meet in order to identify the strains of flu that they believe will infect most people.

It takes about two weeks for good protection to kick in.

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Of the 3,000 vaccines Public Health bought this year, 334 are still available.

"So typically there's no cost to the vaccine", she said.

If you plan to get a flu vaccination in time to protect you during the Christmas holidays, you may be running out of time.

The strains of influenza spreading across Canada are especially harsh this year, while the vaccine is not as effective as would be hoped.

"By getting the vaccine you're not only protecting yourself but it's that herd immunity".

For needle-phobes, there's a skin-deep vaccine that uses tiny needles, and a needle-free jet injector that shoots another vaccine through the skin.

He also suggests for older folks to ask for the higher dose of the flu shot, since your immune system isn't as strong.

But the Fauci article points to another possible factor: most flu vaccines are grown in eggs. The nasal spray vaccines are not being offered.

Doctors are encouraging everyone to get a flu shot during National Influenza Vaccination Week.

Other reports by LeisureTravelAid

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