Natalie Portman on sexual harassment

Danny Woods
November 23, 2017

Portman reflected on her own experiences with the wave of sexual harassment and assault stories that emerged following the Harvey Weinstein scandal.

While speaking onstage during the 2017 Vulture Festival LA presented by AT&T at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, the 36-year-old actress expressed her love for the hit Comedy Central series. She was quoted as saying, "When I heard everything coming out, I was like, wow, I'm so lucky that I haven't had this".

But it quickly dawned on her that while she'd "definitely never been assaulted" she had experienced "harassment on nearly everything" she'd ever worked on. "And I think a lot of people have had this awakening about themselves, stuff that we took for granted, as if they were part of the process ".

"There are so many things that we took for granted as part of our world until it changed a month ago", Portman said, adding that she was glad women weren't going to sit by and "put up with" it. "And then, on reflection, I was like, okay, definitely never been assaulted, definitely not, but I've had discrimination or harassment on nearly everything I've ever worked on in some way". She expressed her discomfort with the situation, which she said the producer respected. But that was super not okay, you know? "And then, on reflection, I was like, okay, definitely never been assaulted, definitely not, but I've had discrimination or harassment on nearly everything I've ever worked on in some way", said Portman on Sunday, addressing a Los Angeles festival organized by the entertainment website Vulture.

Portman also admitted she turned down work that could lead to her being overly objectified when she was younger.

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This is unedited, unformatted feed from the Press Trust of India wire.

Portman also recounted a few instances where, though she remained safe, high-ranking male industry insiders forced her to make statements or decisions based on her personal safety instead of her career.

"When you're defensive as a woman against being looked at that way, that you're like, "I don't want to"-what do we close off of ourselves or diminish in ourselves because we want to protect ourselves?" The more she reexamined them, she said, the more she realized that some of the experiences she dismissed were things that Hollywood needed to reckon with.

In other past instances involving male co-workers, she said her opinions were ignored or her input was deemed "exhausting". I've been afraid. "It can be understood..."

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