German SPD rejects coalition with Merkel, wants new election

Gladys Abbott
November 22, 2017

It could be all over for Angela Merkel very soon after her attempt to build a coalition of conservatives and two smaller parties collapsed on Sunday.

The main sticking points involving migration and climate change, Sky News reports. In a separate interview with broadcaster ZDF, Merkel said she is "skeptical" about such a government."Germany needs a stable government that doesn't need to search for a majority for every decision", she said.Merkel also said she was still prepared to serve as chancellor for another four years, assuming a viable coalition can be formed.

She added: "We should talk about how we form a process that leads our country into a new, stable government".

Her partners in the outgoing government, the centre-left Social Democrats, insisted on Monday that they will not renew the alliance.

'I don't want to say never today, but I am very sceptical and I think that new elections would then be the better way'.

He said it was clear that his conservatives had a mandate to govern and that the parties should support President Frank-Walter Steinmeier's appeal to parties to take responsibility and come together to form a government.

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Germany's president has urged the political parties to reconsider their positions and make it possible to form a new government.

SPD leader Martin Schulz announced the party's stance after exploratory talks on forming a government between Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU), its Bavarian counterpart the CSU, the Greens and the liberal Free Democrats collapsed late Sunday night.

Either way, the setback has raised concerns about the political stability of Europe's largest economy.

However, she said the SPD would use the talks with Steinmeier to try to find future solutions.

It is likely to be a while before the situation is resolved.

Other reports by LeisureTravelAid

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