Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

Gwen Vasquez
November 9, 2017

Facebook is asking some of its users to send them their nude pictures.

Facebook has previously taken steps to tackle revenge porn, launching a series of tools in April of this year that allow users to report intimate images posted without consent.

Facebook has partnered with an Australian government agency to prevent sexual images - colloquially known as "nudes" - from being shared on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger without the subject's consent.

If you're anxious your intimate photos will end up on Instagram or Facebook, you can get in contact with Australi's e-Safety Commissioner.

Facebook wants you to send in your nudes, so the company can battle revenge porn - and it's totally legit.

But you'd need to trust Facebook a great deal to think that's part of a solution. The company says it won't store the photos but instead create a digital footprint so that its image-matching technology can prevent any future uploading of a copy of the photograph. Firstly, the user has to upload an explicit photo of themselves to the messenger (later delete the same from chat). With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim.

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Facebook will then be able to track the hash online with the help of the algorithms used in photos and video matching tools.

However, the trial won't completely solve Australia's revenge porn woes, Clare McGlynn, an expert from Durham Law School, told BBC.

"Revenge porn is a huge problem and Facebook could be held liable for it, so they are trying to do something".

According to The Guardian, in Australia, Facebook is planning to mark your nudes as "do not post". Instead, the social media giant will only store the "hash" of your photo, not the actual photo itself. If another user tries to upload the same image on Facebook or Instagram, Facebook will test it against its stored hashes, and stop those labeled as revenge porn from being distributed.

According to reports, Australians who believe they may have had their private photos stolen or shared will contact e-Safety. "We look forward to getting feedback and learning", a Facebook spokesman said.

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