White House hedges Trump's call for Congress to investigate United States media outlets

Frederick Owens
October 10, 2017

A reporter asked Sanders if Trump saw a distinction between actual fake news, which is being explored tangentially by the Senate Intelligence Committee as part of its Russian Federation probe, and what he calls "fake news", or stories he dislikes.

"I'm simply saying that all options are on the table, as they have been", Sanders said later of the remark. "And that's all that today was about". When pressed as to what he meant, especially given the problems with North Korea and rumors he will decertify the Iran nuclear agreement, the president would only say, "You'll find out".

While Republicans, the media, and even some Trumpworld figures despicably try to tar Democrats with the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders took a hard pass on the issue at Friday's White House daily briefing. "Maybe it's the calm before the storm".

Asked if the comment was in reference to any specific country, Sanders added: "I believe it was just a general comment".

"I think that it is sad that the Mayor of San Juan chose to make that a political statement instead of a time of focusing on the relief efforts".

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The Trump-stirred confusion over Puerto Rico's debt - the comment that "we're going to have to wipe that out" - is but the latest that his handlers had to clean up to plug the gap between his words and actual policy.

At the Thursday meeting, Trump reiterated his administration's opposition to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, saying the US would not "allow this dictatorship to threaten our nation or allies with unimaginable loss of life". The State Department denied that Tillerson made such comments.

"Absolutely. The president is an incredible advocate of the First Amendment", Sanders replied.

Sanders cited statistics showing that only five percent of the media's coverage was positive about the president, despite good news in the stock market, job numbers, cutting regulations and the war against ISIS.

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