It's going to shower meteors August 12

Gwen Vasquez
August 13, 2017

The meteors, mostly no bigger than a grain of sand, burn up as they hit the atmosphere at 58 kilometres (36 miles) per second to produce a shooting stream of light in the sky. But it will not be forgotten because the earth passes through the dust and debris it leaves behind every year, creating the annual perseid meteor shower.

Because the meteors are coming approximately from the direction of the Perseus constellation (thus the name Perseid), look between the northeastern horizon and the point right above you. It last passed near Earth during its orbit around the sun in 1992, and the next time will be in 2126.

Following the full moon from August 7, a rather bright waning gibbous on Saturday night could affect your ability to see the shower, impacting the visibility of about half the meteors.

The greatest numbers of meteors will be between midnight and just before dawn on the mornings of August 11-13.

The Perseid meteor shower is poised to reach its peak this weekend (12/13 August), giving stargazers a chance to get a rare glimpse of a spectacular night-time display. At its peak, the Perseid meteor shower will see about 50-60 meteors from the Swift-Tuttle comet cruise across the sky every hour.

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He added: "We can look forward to a decent display, even though they aren't going to be raining down from the sky".

Astronomers says hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky in a display that may be visible around the world.

If you stay up late to find your area covered in cloud, or you live in a busy city with high levels of light pollution, then you can watch the live stream here. You will also want to be patient.

McGillivray will be part of a group who will be watching at Aldergrove Lake Park in Langley on Saturday night.

If you do miss the Perseids this year, the next big meteor show will be the Leonids in November. After the moon is up, that number drops to about 20 to 30 meteors an hour.

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