Husband's tribute to his 'curvy' wife sparks backlash — BBCI

Isaac Cain
August 8, 2017

As a teenager, I was often teased by my friends for my attraction to girls on the thicker side, ones who were shorter and curvier, girls that the average (basic) bro might refer to as "chubby" or even "fat".

In his post, Robbie claimed that: 'As a teenager, I was often teased by my friends for my attraction to girls on the thicker side, ones who were shorter and curvier, girls that the average (basic) bro might refer to as "chubby" or even "fat"'. "We need more men like you in this world".

Robbie wrote that it was a lie that only tall and slender women were sexy, and that his wife - replete with "thick thighs, big booty, cute little side roll, etc." - is the sexiest to him.

He went on to say that although his wife's body "won't be the one featured on the cover of Cosmopolitan", she is still the one that stole his heart. "There's nothing sexier to me than a woman who is both curvy and confident", he writes, blissfully unaware that he is still telling women how to look and feel. It's all about having confidence and loving yourself for who you are, not what society thinks you should be. She has lovely stretch marks on her hips and cute little dimples on her booty. "You're hating on a guy celebrating his lovely wife who he's attracted to".

Others on the internet were quick to criticize Tripp for his post, citing his misunderstanding of feminism.

He's saying that she normally wouldn't be considered hot, sexy, and lovely due to her size, and that women who don't find some white knight willing to look past this won't experience that kind of affection and love. However, his message is tinged in problematic language.

The Huffington Post wrote an article titled, "Husband's Love Note To His "Curvy" Wife Should Be Required Reading". This is only one type of person who in the fight against fatphobia has it a little easier than most. You have no idea about feminism.

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"I realised how many men have bought into that lie", he wrote.

Speaking to Today, Sarah Tripp, 25, said that the post is typical of her husband's nature.

Another commented that the post was "insulting" and argued that a woman would rarely say something similar about a man. "All women are real, our curves or lack there of are real, and we should first love ourselves before we expect a man (or woman) to love us back". "So much positivity and love have come from [the post]". Women of all shapes and sizes are handsome.

"Lol but like this somehow still reeks of objectification", another commented. Sorry, Kevin, but you're just making me really self-conscious about what I'm eating, which is a whole other problematic ballgame. "I wanted to celebrate a woman in my life that represents all the curvy women who have those thick thighs and that big booty", said Robbie. Robbie urged other men to think again about the societal norms of desire, and called real women those who aren't movie characters, porn stars or bikini mannequins. Real man and a real woman.

Sarah herself doesn't seem to mind.

Hundreds of women have taken aim at Tripp - who recently gave a Tedx Talk entitled: Why I'm A Proud Millennial "Narcissist" -not only for his words about his wife, but also for past tweets where he's made some rather unfortunate observations.

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