Be sure to protect your eyes during the solar eclipse

Frederick Owens
August 12, 2017

On Aug. 21 millions of people will look skyward as day turns into night when the first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in almost a century passes over Middle Tennessee.

What's more, while it's perfectly safe to look at the sun during the totality, this period is relative short, so it's extremely important to wear the eclipse glasses again before the moon begins to move again.

Stay with ABC 17 News and ABC 17 Stormtrack Weather as we continue to bring you more information on the 2017 total solar eclipse. Partial eclipses happen a couple of times per year around the globe, but full solar eclipses are rarer.

While some prepare to make the trek somewhere in the USA where the eclipse will be total, others are staying behind to hold a free viewing party at the observatory near Little Wolf Beach in Tupper Lake.

So, how can you tell if your solar viewer isn't safe?

The average high for temperatures in Mid-Missouri on August 21 are in the upper 80s and with the eclipse starting a quarter before noon, we can estimate temperatures will be in the mid-70s.

"The so-called coronagraphs that are aloft hide more than the first inner radius of the sun, leaving a whole region that's just for us to study during an eclipse", he added.

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Glasses or other solar filters also shouldn't be used if they're scratched or damaged, according to the astronomical society.

So what will the sun look like your proper glasses?

Those interested in viewing the solar eclipse can attend a public viewing event on Quincy Hill from 12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Though the North Country does not get the fun of seeing the solar corona, there are still fascinating observations to be made with a partial eclipse.

"There are some folks out there who've perhaps never viewed a total eclipse before". The eclipse will move from the West Coast to the East Coast, ending near Columbia, South Carolina, at 2:44 p.m. But the crew will be able to see the umbra, where the eclipse is total, near the southern horizon. However, a simple question led to one woman becoming a punchline after she asked to reschedule the eclipse so her son could watch it.

As a result, demand is soaring for safe glasses for viewing it. If you glance at the sun through your glasses, for example, and find it uncomfortably bright, out of focus and surrounded by a murky haze, they're no good.

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