Artificial sweeteners up the risk of weight gain, diabetes, says study

Faith Castro
August 12, 2017

"In other words, the assumption that more calories trigger greater metabolic and brain response is wrong", said Dana Small, professor at Yale University.

The researchers also said this study might help in explaining prior studies that reported that the artificial sweeteners has the potential to increase the blood sugar levels and possibly lead to diabetes.

"When sweet taste and energy are not matched, less energy is metabolised and inaccurate signals go to the brain".

Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, added: "This research should be enough to convince you that artificial ingredients, whether they be in food or drink, can screw up your system even though they may sound healthy".

However, when a "mismatch" occurs, the calories fail to trigger the body's metabolism, and the reward circuits in the brain fail to recognize that calories have been consumed. He says that the calories are only half part of the entire equation and the sweet taste perception will occupy the remaining portion. Any one of these impacts might affect the metabolic health of the concerned person.

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"Our bodies evolved to efficiently use the energy sources available in nature", Small said.

The study was performed on a set of 15 people who consumed diet drinks and others who drank regular ones. The amount of energy burned by the body was also monitored.

Batch with diet soft drink consumption resulted in eating more as their brain did not register calorie count.

Researchers at Yale University say in nature sweetness signals the presence of energy, so that the sweeter something tastes, the more calories it contains. In some cases, when it mismatches the calories will fail to activate the metabolism. He commented that the findings of the study are not supported by observational proof on long-term consumers of artificial sweeteners.

Diet drinks and meals could cause people to put on weight and trigger diabetes even when they are low-calorie.

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