Trump's travel ban: What they are saying about the Supreme Court decision

Faith Castro
June 27, 2017

However, the Supreme Court of the United States declared that the government can not ban people if they have a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.

Governor Dannel Malloy reacted to the Supreme Court ruling to move President Donald Trump's travel ban forward.

"This is a complete and utter vindication of the president", Gorka said.

Implementing the ban may cause chaos at airports, experts warn. The court is expected to decide within days if the Trump administration can enforce it's travel ban.

News of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision has left Al-Hashedi wondering if Canada can offer any help to people caught in the same situation as her.

That is because the high court effectively allowed Trump to ban from coming to the United States only citizens of six majority-Muslim countries "who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States".

"As for entities, the relationship must be formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the goal of evading the executive order".

The ban affects people from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

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The decision allows officials to block entry of the affected travelers for 90 days and refugees for 120 days. The effect on refugees could be greater because they are less likely to have family, school or business relationships in the United States.

The high court allowed parts of the travel ban to stand and agreed to hear the case in the fall. Other observers counter that the nature of the court's unsigned opinion suggests its justices are seeking compromise and will be loath to take such a politically provocative act as scrapping the ban outright.

"As it is imperative that the traveling public maintain confidence in an industry so vital to our nation's economy, we ask that the Administration set clear implementation guidelines in the interim so uncertainty, and the travel disruptions likely to result, are kept to an absolute minimum", ASTA said.

The other basic portion of Trump's initiative, which will remain partially blocked, will be the prohibition on USA entry to citizens of Iran, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen and Libya, although entry will be allowed for people from those countries who have relatives or job contracts in the US.

"The Supreme Court's ruling on Donald Trump's travel ban is like an optical illusion: Your perception of it changes depending on your vantage point".

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to disclose the information. After the federal court struck down that order, Mr. Trump revised it in March, dropping Iraq from the list and carving out exemptions for people who have a US green card.

"The court went out of its way to not tip its hand as to how it will rule on the ultimate issue, which is whether the president has the power to do this". The travel ban also caps the number of refugees allowed to enter the U.S.at 50,000 a year.

Justices offered several examples of scenarios in which travel ban shouldn't apply - such as a foreign national who wishes to live with a family member in the U.S. or a student accepted to an American university - but what if the individual's connection to the United States is more attenuated or not as well defined? "It's going to be really important for us to make sure the government abides by the terms of the order and does not try to use it as a backdoor into implementing the full- scale Muslim ban", said Omar Jadwat, the American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who is representing some of the challengers to the travel ban. Months of media coverage featured street protests denouncing Trump's immigration policy as unconstitutional and panels of legal beagles and lefty activists nodding in agreement. The president announced the travel ban a week after he took office in January and revised it in March after setbacks in court.

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